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ICE # 1 - GRINNELL GLACIER- MONTANA - 2017

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ICE #2- PORTAGE GLACIER- ALASKA - 2019

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ICE #3 - PORTAGE GLACIER- CLOSE UP- 2019

PORTAGE MELTING GLACIER- CLOSE UP - 2

ICE #4 - PORTAGE GLACIER- CLOSE UP-2019

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ICE #5 - PORTAGE GLACIER- ALASKA -2019

Fjallsjokull Glacier Iceland

ICE #6 - FJALLSJOKULL GLACIER ICELAND 

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ICE #7 - SKAFTAFELLJOKULL - GLACIER ICELAND 

SKAFTAFELL IN COLOR

ICE #7 - SKAFTAFELL IN COLOR 

Svínafellsjökull_BEFORE_AFTER
Svínafellsjökull in color

ICE #8 - SVINAFELLSJOKULL GLACIER ICELAND

ICE #9 - SVINAFELLSJOKULL GLACIER ICELAND

The ICE PROJECT consists of 6 photographs currently, in which 3 of them are Diptychs, before and after photographs. It is to represent a true visual reference of the changing landscape in the past 100 years in our treasured National Parks, the Glacier National Park in Montana, and Chugach National Forest in Alaska.  This project will continue on through other delicate parts of the world like Iceland, Greenland and beyond. 

ICE #1 – Grinnell Glacier in Montana has seen excessive melting glaciers in the past decade. The Glaciers are melting so fast that is one of the most visibly effected by climate change occurring in a US Park. Soon enough Glacier Park, hence the name, will have no more glaciers because warming temperatures. In this image on the right taken in 2017 at Iceberg Lake in Grinnell Glacier, you can see the receding icebergs and the receding mouth of the glacier which now is relatively a lake. The image on the left, taken in 1910 by John Morton, in collaboration with University of Montana image archives, shows the peak of Grinnell looking down at the mouth of the glacier. It’s apparent in the before and after comparison, the contrast of melting glaciers. 

 

ICE #2 – Portage Glacier in Alaska’s Chugach National Forest is another glacier that has seen rapidly changing effects of Climate change in the past 100 years. The image on the left taken in 1939 from the archives of the United States Geological Survey shows the terminus or mouth of the glacier as it appeared during this time. On the right exhibits the front of the glacier in 2017. Since 1939 the terminus and the mouth of the glacier has receded more than 3 miles from where it used to be in 1939. 

 

ICE #3 – Portage Glacier, a close-up image, shows the glacier run off from the hanging glacier. As this is also a cause by climate change when there is excessive and rapid melting, it is also a normal process where the glacier water helps habitation during the summer months. In 2019, Alaska recorded the hottest summer on record, which resulted in excessive melting in the region. 

 

ICE #4 – Another close-up view of Portage Glacier and glacier runoff from the receding hanging glacier. 

 

ICE #5- Portage Glacier in 1958 on the left from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows the glacier and Portage Lake filled with icebergs and ice. It was then when it had already started retreating from the 1930s. Portage Glacier once ended on land, on the other side of what it is now Portage Lake. 

 

ICE #6 - Fjallsjokull Glacier, Iceland. 

ICE #7 - 1986 vs. 2023 - Skaftafelljokull Iceland, has seen significant retreat like many other glaciers in Iceland. I’ve been doing a lot of photo research in this area and the glaciers and was not able to find an archival photo from about 100 years ago, so we could see the significant difference. You can still see the major retreat from the same approximate point of area on the edge of glacier the melting and glacier lagoon as well the shrinking tongue of the glacier. It is measured that today the retreat is happening 5 cm at the Bottom of the glacier, daily, and 20 cm at the mid to top of the glacier. “It has dramatically retreated, with scientists estimating it had shrunk by about 400 square kilometres, which is about the size of the Isle of Wight, as a result of climate change.” (BBC news) 


Left image : National Land survey of Iceland -1986 
Right image: Mona Miri 2023

ICE #8 - Skaftafell in color Mona Miri 2023

ICE #9 - 1986 vs. 2023 - Svinafellsjokull Glacier, Iceland. Also seen a significant retreat since the year 2000 the terminus has retreated about 200 meters, ( 656 ft. ). Although the position of the terminus ( the tongue ) did not change from 1950 - 1990, it was measured that ice on the glacier had thinned significantly but not retreated. It's been measure by the Icelandic Geological Society that is has thinned 150 meters ( 492 ft. ) since 1900. 

  

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